Life is (generally) wonderful

4,408 notes

fishingboatproceeds:

elysemarshall:

newyorker:

In the magazine this week, Margaret Talbot profiles the novelist John Green, and looks at how he created a vibrant fan community long before the release of his best-selling book, “The Fault in Our Stars”: http://nyr.kr/1iMf1MN
Illustration by Bartosz Kosowski.

It’s a long read, but well worth the time. Fantastic piece.

The best piece yet written, I think, about my books and the history of nerdfighteria. 

John, your facial hair looks very… uh… willowy in this drawing. Like little sprouts growing out of your face. It’s a little frightening.

fishingboatproceeds:

elysemarshall:

newyorker:

In the magazine this week, Margaret Talbot profiles the novelist John Green, and looks at how he created a vibrant fan community long before the release of his best-selling book, “The Fault in Our Stars”: http://nyr.kr/1iMf1MN

Illustration by Bartosz Kosowski.

It’s a long read, but well worth the time. Fantastic piece.

The best piece yet written, I think, about my books and the history of nerdfighteria. 

John, your facial hair looks very… uh… willowy in this drawing. Like little sprouts growing out of your face. It’s a little frightening.

(Source: newyorker.com)

Filed under john green

4 notes

Why We Are Talking About This (A Rant)

This evening on my facebook feed, a friend posted a TIME article which was a collection of some of the #YesAllWomen tweets. I found out about the hashtag yesterday and spent a couple of hours last night reading it. After I clicked, another TIME article popped up on FB as “recommended” - this one called “Misogyny Didn’t Turn Elliot Rodger Into a Killer.” I was curious, so I read it. I strongly felt I needed to write a rebuttal, but I told myself it was too much trouble and did easier things. Several hours later, I can’t forget about it - so here goes.


1) First we have a paragraph where the author lists many of the societal inequalities that women face, with the general message that misogyny is bad - but this is followed up with: “It’s not difficult to understand why women would perceive the deck being culturally stacked against them.” And that’s when I scrolled up to the top of the page to check the gender of the author. Guess how surprised I was by what I found? Really, Mr. Ferguson, you made a list of actual facts about cultural misogyny and then called it all a perception? This is the voice of someone who has never experienced (or even thought very hard about, I would wager) the sort of discrimination he is describing.


2) “That misogyny can, and certain[ly] does, spill over into violence in the case of (one hopes) a small percentage of men whose anger toward women is beyond control.”


While I have had a hard time finding any statistics that deal with the percentage of the male population of the United States that has engaged in violence toward women, I can find a shitload of facts about how many women have experienced violence from men. One in every 5 American women will experience a rape in her lifetime. Intimate partner violence made up 20% of all nonfatal violent crime experienced by women in 2001. These are overwhelmingly acts committed by men. Unfortunately, Mr. Ferguson, your hope of a vanishingly small percentage of men translating their misogyny into violent action does not seem to have affected reality any.


3) “Rodger appears to have indeed been a misogynist, but this misogyny appears to have raged from within, a product of his anger, sexual frustrations and despondency rather than anything “taught” to him by society.”


Really. Really. Really?? You actually believe this? Okay, calming breaths. You think that this young man existed in a cultural vacuum where advertising, movies, and the attitudes of people he has known throughout his life could not possibly have affected his attitudes? He couldn’t have absorbed the skewed beliefs that we are all exposed to, and then in his mental illness twisted them further? You are being disingenuous, sir.


4) Ferguson concludes by emphasizing that this “idiosyncratic element” should not be our main focus when we consider Rodger’s actions; that his mental illness is much more important than his misogyny. This is what I have to say about that:


No, misogyny didn’t turn Elliot Rodger into a killer. But I know that places exist on the internet like the subreddit “The Red Pill,” where Men’s Rights activists congregate to declare themselves superior, complain about the scourge of feminism, and wonder why the women who owe them sex won’t give it to them. I know that the hashtag #YesAllWomen is constantly renewing with stories of casual, institutionalized sexism that never got a second thought from anybody but its victim. So - yes, I believe misogyny provided Rodger with a foundation and an echo chamber for his opinions on women. It gave him other people who validated his desire to perpetrate violence and his twisted reasons for doing so (the comments agreeing with his YouTube screeds are particularly vile). It gave him a culture to exist in where doing right by women, where truly having them be equally valuable people, is harder than simply seeing them as objects to be used.


Yes, this man was mentally ill. Yes, he murdered seven people - including 5 men - on a rampage, which is not typical behaviour. But he was not unusual in his misogynistic beliefs. And THAT is why we need to be talking about this.

Filed under yesallwomen TIME magazine misogyny feminism violence against women

16 notes

I spent my morning with 5 middle aged strangers, my first experience with people who actually believe in the "lazy millennial generation" stereotype

curlycurvynotquitestraight:

I was in a position of some authority so felt comfortable speaking my mind, and in no way shy to educate them on a few points.

  • It is very rare for someone to get a job in their field directly out of university right now. This is why your children are moving back home.
  • Almost any job you find…

Filed under truth truthy truth truth lazy millenials this is why your children are moving back home